Plate No 11

Plate No 11

The remains of an unidentified rotary engine near Fairlie, Ayrshire. “My cousin was a trawlerman,” says the farmer who owns the land where the turbine is kept. “In the '70s, the net snagged off Beaufort’s Dyke. The fool dragged this thing up to the surface thinking he’d salvaged something valuable. It ruined the net and it ruined him. It’s worthless junk.” Beaufort’s Dyke is a deep submarine trench off the south-west coast of Scotland that was used as Britain’s largest offshore dumping ground for conventional and chemical munitions until the practice was officially ended in 1976. In 1997, the Government admitted that “low level” radioactive waste had also been disposed of at the site in the 1950s.
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Plate No 11

Plate No 11

The remains of an unidentified rotary engine near Fairlie, Ayrshire. “My cousin was a trawlerman,” says the farmer who owns the land where the turbine is kept. “In the '70s, the net snagged off Beaufort’s Dyke. The fool dragged this thing up to the surface thinking he’d salvaged something valuable. It ruined the net and it ruined him. It’s worthless junk.” Beaufort’s Dyke is a deep submarine trench off the south-west coast of Scotland that was used as Britain’s largest offshore dumping ground for conventional and chemical munitions until the practice was officially ended in 1976. In 1997, the Government admitted that “low level” radioactive waste had also been disposed of at the site in the 1950s.
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